Lauren loved working with and looking after children and she was intent on making
her career out of caring for youngsters.  She had already started and at 17 was
training to become a nursery nurse.  One of her many great loves was music and she
ensured that all those around her were cheered by her laughter and music, she was a
bundle of fun and the sort of girl everyone wanted to be a friend of.
Some wonderful work was underway within days of the Tsunami and this has never stopped.  Both
local Thai and International efforts have been made and they have made the world of difference,
projects are never better than when both can come together in the best interest of what is best
for the short, medium and longer term welfare of the children.

One such project was the brain child of Thai charity workers more used to helping the most
underprivileged families and children of Bangkok's slums around the river areas.  After years of
experience a contingent of workers moved to the south to see what could be done for the children
orphaned, bereaved and traumatised in the after effects of the tsunami.

After the most immediate needs were taken care off the emphasis changed to helping the children
become positive about the future again and to help them through their grieving process.  
Expression is a clinically proven benefit to youngsters and so a music and art project was set up to
assist them.

Lauren's Fund objective is therefore to assist with providing a suitable
central base in Baan Nam Khem so that the wonderful work already
accomplished can carry on.
The music project is already very well established.  The above picture is a
group called

'The Little Hands'

which formed from local youths who wanted to help the children too.

They give their time teaching children to play instruments and to sing
and join them in making fun, noise, laughter, and 'music' - actually some
of it is very good indeed!

26th February would have marked Lauren's 19th
birthday and as it happens her sister Emma's too, she
is to be 22.

To celebrate the family intend to have a party and
invite family and close friends to hear about the launch
of Lauren's fund, to have a great family get together
with Karaoke, raffles and laughter.
Lauren, centre with her sister Emma and
brother Paul


Lauren's Fund is now set up separately and can be paid into by
making checks paid out to;

Laurens Gift

Direct payments can be made to;

Lauren's Gift
Nationwide
A/c No. 33333334
Sort Code.  07-00-93
Lauren, centre with
her Mum and Dad;
Bridget and Ron Eley

" The 26th February 2006
would have been Lauren's
19th Birthday and we will
make it a day to remember
and one she would have been
proud of "
Tsunami in Asia
"Lauren's Gift"
Objectives of Laurens Fund
Lauren's Fund;    Should you like more details or feel you could
also assist in any way please contact  pwarsop@gmail.com
Lauren's 19th Birthday Party  -  26 February 2006
The Lauren Eley Centre for Music & Art

Friends and family gathered to celebrate Lauren's and
Emma's birthday.  Fond memories were rekindled and
after a raffle, Karaoke and good food Laurens memorial
fund had double to around £1,500.

Thanks to every one who supported the event and watch
this space for further news and activities to assist Thai
Tsunami victim children in the name of Lauren's Fund
2006 Visits to Thailand to review further needs

A number of visits to Baan Nam Khem have been made in 2006, the results of which confirmed to us all that the children of the area are certainly
benefiting from the Art and Music project.  A UK charity had donated a mobile unit which has enabled the Little Hands Art Foundation to visit
children in small villages and other towns and the work involved in visiting schools has proved so popular they have been increased considerably
over the last year

The Art and Music Project is still without a centre within the main town and so this is now becoming the main priority.
The Fund raising at the birthday party was
inspirational for Bridget and the family  -  so
what's next  ............

During visits to Baan Nam Khem in August it was obvious that children
were no longer able to visit the art and music centres in the old camp
sites and if anything other than the mobile unit was to be used in the
future a permanent house or base was required in the main town.  
Bridget, Ron and the family decided that if they donated Lauren's fund
they already had enough money to buy half of what was needed to buy
a small house in the town which could then be used as a base for
operations and a place for children to visit.

A suitable property was found and purchased in September.

The work began immediately to raise the finances to pay for the second
half of the property and then to make changes to enable it to be used
as a base for the Children's Art and Music Project.

The minimum amount required would be £3,500.

100% of all cash raised goes into the property and alterations as all
administrative and organisational costs are funded privately.
This house in the centre of the town was purchased in September and will
be refitted to make it suitable to form a base for what will become

"THE LAUREN ELEY CENTRE FOR MUSIC AND ART"
The Lauren Eley Centre for Music and Art    ....    almost 50% paid for

In an attempt to get the ball rolling on the sale of raffle tickets we made a visit to Wimbledon on Sunday 5
November.  This was a special day in the Thai calender and as our aim was to help Thai children we expected to get
a good hearing there, so off we headed at the crack of dawn to the Buddhist Thai Temple.

The Royal Kathina Ceremony And Loy-Kratong Festival

Sunday 5th November began as a bright, crisp sunny morning and the temple helpers and stall holders readied
themselves and their wares as the first visitors began to arrive.  In the main temple the Kathina robe was arranged
at 9.30 a.m. ready for the ceremony which was scheduled for ten.   People began to gather in the temple so as to
witness the ceremony.   The venerable monks chanted and the Kathina robe was presented to the Sangha.   Officials
from The Royal Thai Embassy were in attendance for the occasion.

Bridget and Ron were amongst the first to arrive and soon set up their simple but effective display to help explain
why raffle draw tickets were being sold in Lauren's name to benefit the children who were hurt in the Tsunami.

It wasn't long before it was realised that the day was going to be worthwhile and by the end of it 480 £1 tickets were
sold.  A lot of interest was shown in what we were doing and why.  Most incredibly, would you believe, one very kind
gentleman called Bob decided, after talking to Ron, that he wanted to make a donation to the cause - he returned
shortly afterwards with a cheque made out for £1,000.

We received the odd comment about why we were still collecting for Tsunami victims when the disaster was now 2
years old.  Of course the vast majority, like Bob, fully understood that you don't loose relations (possibly even your
parents too), your home, all your possessions and friends without it taking more than just a couple of years to 'get
over it'.   Frankly no one will 'get them over it' but we can certainly help them to 'live and bear it' with a positive
outlook and assist in improving their prospects.
As dusk started to set in it was time for Bridget and Ron
along with Alesha to make ready to sail their boats on
the lake.  Thai folk lore tells us that setting sail with your
boat with flowers and candles are all your troubles and
concerns.   What comes back is just good luck and
better things for the future.

Nice system - we could all do with more of that!
Alesha shows Bridget how to
launch her boat and say a prayer
so the Loy-Kratong festival
could start at the lake.   
Hundreds of 'Kratongs', their
candles twinkling and
shimmering floated in the lake
making a wonderful spectacle.

This was a lovely and fitting way
to finish our busy day selling
raffle tickets.  Both Thai and
other visitors gave us all such a
warm welcome and enjoyed and
appreciated our efforts to help
young Tsunami victims in
Lauren's name.
Bridget and Ron  - Lauren's parents
Tragically, Lauren is no longer with us but her memory lives on and is, in fact, inspirational in that she still encourages
the family and friends that loved her so dearly to do what she would have wanted to do herself.

Lauren died at around the same time of the Tsunami and would have been horrified at the suffering it created to
everyone and most especially to the children.

It was almost natural therefor for Lauren's parents, Bridget and Ron, her elder sister Emma who shares the same
birthday, and brother Paul to want to donate Lauren's memorial fund to finding ways of assisting the children of the
Tsunami so as to speed their recovery from all of their trauma and suffering.

In fact the family have now decided that they would like to see how much could be done in Lauren's name to add to the
already set up memorial fund so that the children might benefit in some really positive and impact full ways.
Lauren working with children, her great joy

With almost half of the money required for the centre already raised we were off to a great
start but it also meant the pressure was on to ensure that the balance was achievable to
ensure that the building could be made ready and put to good use in the shortest possible
time.

Two projects were thought up by the Eley family and implemented with enthusiasm.  The
first was a Grand Prize Draw and the second a Karaoke evening during which the prize draw
would be made which Bridget called   "Sing for your Supper"
The project is a rather ambitious
one but then so much has been
accomplished over the last year
it is possibly within the grasp of
all of us to help ensure it
succeeds.
On our stand we are soon
reminded that children everywhere
enjoy drawing and expressing
themselves and it wasn't long
before our table was covered in
special graffiti - kids style.

The celebration of monastic boundary,
held on October 30, 1982, enabled
Wat Buddhapadipa to become a
formal temple according to Thai
tradition: in fact, the only Thai temple
ever built in Europe.
Wat Buddhapadipa in
London was the first
Buddhist temple in the
United Kingdom, established
by the London Buddhist
Temple Foundation.

This temple has been under
the Royal Patronage since
1965.  It was moved to its
present site in Calonne
Road, Wimbledon Parkside
in 1976.  With the support
of the Royal Thai
Government and the Thai
people, the Foundation
erected an "Ubosot",  a Thai
style building for monastic
ceremonies.

Although at the end of our busy day we had not
fully realised it, we had once again doubled  
Lauren's fund by taking on the day as much as we
had already collected through the memorial fund
and the Birthday afternoon.

Although the drive home was a long and tiering one
due to heavy traffic and motorway problems we
were content and happy with the progress and
support being shown.  With £3,000 now in the bank
we could at least relax in the thinking that we
would not be letting the children of Baan Nam Khem
down and we knew for sure that Lauren would be
smiling down with such pride at what the family
were accomplishing in her name.

During visits to Baan Nam Khem in August it was obvious that children
were no longer able to visit the art and music centres in the old camp
sites and if anything other than the mobile unit was to be used in the
future a permanent house or base was required in the main town.  
Bridget, Ron and the family decided that if they donated Lauren's fund
they already had enough money to buy half of what was needed to buy
a small house in the town which could then be used as a base for
operations and a place for children to visit.

A suitable property was found and purchased in September.

The work began immediately to raise the finances to pay for the second
half of the property and then to make changes to enable it to be used
as a base for the Children's Art and Music Project.

The minimum amount required would be £3,500.

100% of all cash raised goes into the property and alterations as all
administrative and organisational costs are funded privately.

During visits to Baan Nam Khem in August 06 it was obvious that
children were no longer able to visit the art and music centres in the
old camp sites and if anything other than the mobile unit was to be
used in the future a permanent house or base was required in the main
town.  Bridget, Ron and the family decided that if they donated
Lauren's fund they already had enough money to buy half of what was
needed to buy a small house in the town which could then be used as a
base for operations and a place for children to visit.

A suitable property was found and purchased in September.

The work began immediately to raise the finances to pay for the second
half of the property and then to make changes to enable it to be used
as a base for the Children's Art and Music Project.

The minimum amount required would be £3,500.

100% of all cash raised goes into the property and alterations as all
administrative and organisational costs are funded privately.

Confidence was high and we started to think about Saturday 25th November when the draw
would be held and the 'Sing for your Supper' event run - we knew now we could complete our
mission and at the same time make sure everyone had a great night.
See Lauren Fund page 2 for news on the
Prize Draw and Sing for your Supper night

After a day at the Thai Temple it was interesting to see if their gentle beliefs could help us understand some of the
mystery's of what and why things happen as they do;  Below the line reflections on some Buddhist teachings  .....

You may have wondered at times what life is about, e.g. is there a reason, a purpose, in fact what is it all about.
The Buddha asked the same questions of himself. He became determined to find the answers and so he left his
comfortable lifestyle and became a wandering ascetic, finding many teachers on the way. The teachers taught him
much but still he knew, deep inside, that his questions were still unanswered. And so after almost six years of
searching he decided to practice alone. He sat beneath the Bodhi tree and vowed to sit until he really knew. He
became enlightened. He knew the truth and this truth became the Dhamma. (The Buddha’s teachings).

The four Noble truths that he realized are (1) To live we must suffer. (2) Suffering is caused by craving. (3)
Suffering can be overcome. (4) There is a path leading to the end of suffering. This path is called the Noble
Eightfold Path. The path consists of right understanding, right thought, right speech, right action, right livelihood,
right effort, right mindfulness and right concentration.

And so Buddhism becomes a way of life. The basis being to do no evil, to do good and to purify the mind. Of course
The Buddha meditated and taught his meditation methods to his disciples, these teachings are available to us today
and can help us to lead a more happy and peaceful life.
Daily Dhamma;

Loving-kindness and compassion are medicine to heal all the poisons of the mind;  they can keep us away from the poison.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Other Daily Dhamma:

  • The desires of greed, hatred and delusion, are regarded as a poison for human life. We have to be careful; otherwise we can poison ourselves at
    any time and at any moment.
  • Happiness or pain is the result of our own actions (kamma).
  • "The person who loves others will also be loved in return."
  • It is said that good or bad kamma always follows the doer just as a shadow follows the body.
  • The unexpected can happen at any given time. It is always wise to be prepared for all situations and to be wise to what may happen.
  • Love without virtues such as trust, responsibility and forgiveness etc., will bring about dissatisfaction so love has to possess these virtues.
  • A careless life can be a messy life. Life is like any journey, without good preparation one can get lost easily.
  • Just carry out your duty as best as you can.
  • The Buddha was not a divine being or the creator of all things. He was just a normal man who taught people to understand the truth of existence.
  • “Behold monks, all things, both name and form, depend on each other as fire depends on fuel, without fuel, the fire is out”.
  • We should react to all that which are within and around us with right understanding. Experience them for what they truly are without forming any
    opinion.
  • Freedom is the true happiness. Let things be according to its nature. You may hold, but don’t grasp.
  • Something useless should be made amends and something useful should be developed for the better.
  • We can look back at what has happened in history so that we can act appropriately in the present. There is benefit to every tradition and there
    are lessons to be learnt from every act.
  • If anyone still criticises the Dhamma, he is still clouded by doubt and ignorance.”
  • The Buddha said, “The Dhamma I discovered is for the purification of doubt, delusion and ignorance. It is not for criticism.
  • The purification of the mind is an internal process and we all have the potential to achieve it by means of either destruction or recycling.
  • This life-journey is full of beautiful scenery. It is certain that on the path we may trip over some obstacles on the way, but that makes us
    stronger.
  • Basically mankind has suffering which he has to encounter - do not turn away from it, learn from it.
  • Don’t worry about the world, it can crumble on its own.
  • "The more you desire, the more you attach; the more you attach, the more you become a slave” and on the contrary “the more you detach, the
    more you are free."
  • Every obstacle presents an opportunity to improve one's condition.
  • It is not the burdens of life that weigh us down, it is how we handle them.
  • If we have to believe in something, we should believe in wisdom so that it can help take us out of ignorance.
  • “Not seeing things as they really are” is a contagious illness of mankind.
  • Good or bad is all in the mind. If our mind is good, we will face good things. If we have positive thoughts, we will have good feelings and all the
    bad will eased away.
  • Do our duty whole heartedly. When on duty bare in our mind that it is not our duty, but rather something that has to be done.
  • It is ok to suffer in its moments, but let it end in the moment. Don’t prolong the feeling by reliving it twice.
  • When we look back on our lives, we will see that we have surpassed many suffering. "As long as we are alive, there is no reason to panic"
  • Good or bad is all in the mind. If our mind is good, we will face good things. If we have positive thoughts, we will have good feelings and all the
    bad will eased away.
  • “You can be happy if you are contented with whatever you have and be patient with each other”
  • Even the severest suffering will pass in the end.
  • A loving atmosphere in your home is the foundation for your life.
  • The Buddha said to judge only yourself, and not to others, no matter how good or evil they may be. The Buddha merely points out the way,
    saying, "The truth is like this." Now, is our mind like that or not?
  • When you write something wrong, it can be erased. Wrong action cannot be erased by you or others on your behalf.
  • Don’t do what you don’t want to do. Do what you want to do.
  • Laugh when you want to laugh. Cry when you want to cry and every time after crying you must laugh.
  • To give is to gain; this is the idea behind the act of 'giving' in Buddhism.
  • He whose mind is unsteady, he who knows not the Good Teaching, he whose confidence wavers, the wisdom of such a person does not attain
    fullness.
  • Hard to restrain, unstable is this mind; it flits wherever it lists. Good it is to control the mind. A controlled mind brings happiness.
  • Give not yourselves to negligence; have to intimacy with sense pleasures. The man who meditates with diligence attains much happiness.
  • Fools, men of little intelligence, give themselves over to negligence, but the wise man protects his diligence as a supreme treasure.
  • By endeavour, diligence, discipline, and self-mastery, let the wise man make (of himself) an island that on flood can overwhelm.
  • If you plant good causes, you will reap good effects.
  • The fool do not appreciate generosity or the act of sharing, but the wise do, and it is the wise that will reap happiness in their lives
  • It is very hard to get rid of craving, desire, clinging, attachment, but it is not beyond human ability.
  • Live a good, honorable life. Then when you get older and think back, you’ll be able to enjoy it a second time.
  • A loving atmosphere in your home is the foundation for your life.
  • The first knows the names of a medicinal plant, and the second goes out to find it and uses it.
  • 'As long as I have I have still not attained Supreme Enlightenment, I will not rise from this place, even if my blood dries up.' Do you want to try
    it yourself?
  • A meditator should have a steady awareness within himself.
  • Open your arms to change, but don’t let go of your values.
  • Even if he slept near the Buddha, he wouldn't see the Buddha, if he didn't practice.
  • Open your arms to change, but don’t let go of your values.
  • When you realize you’ve made a mistake, take immediate steps to correct it.
  • When you lose, don’t lose the lesson.
  • Neither in the sky nor in mid-ocean, nor by entering into mountain clefts, nowhere in the world is there a place where one will not be overcome by
    death.
  • Neither in the sky nor in mid-ocean, nor by entering into mountain clefts, nowhere in the world is there a place where one may escape from the
    results of evil deeds.
  • Think not lightly of good, saying, "It will not come to me." Drop by drop is the water pot filled. Likewise, the wise, gathering it little by little,
    fills himself with good.
  • Think not lightly of evil, saying, "It will not come to me." Drop by drop is the water pot filled. Likewise, the fool, gathering it little by little, fills
    himself with evil.
  • It may be ill with the doer of good as long as the good ripens not. But when it does ripen, then the doer of good sees (the pleasant results of) his
    good deeds.
  • It may be well with the evil-doer as long as the evil ripens not. But when it does ripen, then the evil-doer sees (the painful results of) his evil
    deeds.
  • Should a person do good, let him do it again and again. Let him find pleasure therein, for blissful is the accumlation of good.
  • Hasten to do good: restrain your mind from evil. He who is slow in doing good, his mind delights in evil.
  • Better it is to live one day seeing the Supreme Truth than to live a hundred years without ever seeing the Supreme Truth.
  • Better it is to live one day seeing the deathless than to live a hundred years without ever seeing the deathless.
  • Better it is to live one day seeing the rise and fall of things than to live a hundred years without ever seeing the rise and fall of things.
  • Better it is to live one day strenuous and resolute than to live a hundred years sluggish and disspated.
  • Better it is to live one day wise and meditative than to live a hundred years foolish and uncontrolled.
  • Better it is to live one day virtuous and meditative than to live a hundred years immoral and uncontrolled.
  • To one ever eager to revere and serve the elders, these four blessings accrue: long life and beauty, happiness and power.
  • Through for a hundred years one should tend the sacrificial fire in the forest, yet if only for a moment one should worship those of perfected
    minds that worship is indeed better than a century of sacrifice.
  • Through month after month for a hundred years one should offer sacrifices by the thousands, yet if only for a moment one should worship those
    of perfected minds that honour is indeed better than a century of sacrifice.
  • Self-conquest is far better than the conquest of others. Not even a god, an angel, Mara or Brahma can turn into defeat the victory of such a
    person who is self-subdued and ever restrained in conduct.
  • Though one may conquer a thousand times a thousand men in battle, yet he indeed is the noblest victor who conquers himself.
  • Better than reciting a thousand meaningless verses is the reciting of one verse of Dhamma, hearing which one attains peace.
  • Better than a thousand useless words is one useful word, hearing which one attains peace.
  • That monk who while young devotes himself to the teaching of the Buddha illumines this world like the moon freed from clouds.
  • Full of joy, full of faith in the teaching of the Buddha, the monk attains the peaceful state, the bliss of cessation of conditioned things.
  • One is one's own protector, one is one's own refuge. Therefore, one should control oneself, even as the trader controls a noble steed.
  • By oneself one must censure oneself and scrutinize oneself. The self-guarded and mindful monk will always live in happiness.
  • The monk who is calm in body, calm in speech, calm in thought, well composed and who has spewn out worldiness - he truly, is called serene.
  • Just as the jasmine creeper sheds its withered flowers, even so, O monks, should you totally shed lust and hatred!
  • Control of the senses, contenment, restraint according to the code of monastic discipline - these form the basis of holy life here for the wise
    monk.
  • Whenever he sees with insight the rise and fall of the aggregates, he is full of joy and happiness. To the discerning one this reflects the
    Deathless.
  • The monk who has retired to a solitary abode and calmed his mind, who comprehends the Dhamma with insight, in him there arises a delight that
    transcends all human delights.
  • There is no meditative concentration for him who lacks insight, and no insight for him who lacks meditative concentration. He in whom are found
    both meditative concentration and insight, indeed, is close to Nibbana.
  • Meditate, O monk! Do not be heedless. Let not your mind whirl on sensual pleasures. Heedless, do not swallow a red hot iron ball, lest you cry
    when burning, "O this is painful!"
  • Cut off the five, abandon the five, and cultivate the five. The monk who has overcome the five bonds is called one who has crossed the flood.
  • Monk, empty this body, it will sail lightly. Rid of lust and hatred, you shall reach Nibbana.
  • The monk who abides in universal love and is deeply devoted to learning and practising Dhamma can develop himself and help the others.
  • He who has no attachment whatsoever for the mind and body, who does not grieve for what he has not - he is truly called a monk.
  • He who wholly subdues evil both small and great is called a monk, because he has overcome all evil.
  • Those who restrain their feelings they are diligent, patient and moderate in eating, they are not overwhelmed by any desire, like a mountain is
    not disturbed by the wind.
  • All things are not self - when one sees this with wisdom, one turns away from suffering. This is the path to purification.
  • We don't meditate to see heaven, but to end suffering.
  • Don't try to teach a pig to sing, It wastes your time and it annoys the pig.
  • He who seeks anothers's faults, who is ever censorious - his cankers grow. He is far from destruction of the cankers.
  • If it isn't good, let it die. If it does not die, make it good.
  • No one and nothing can free you but your own understanding.
  • The greatest power to complete every thing is love.
  • The most dangerous weapon we should beware of is malicious speech.
  • When we give to the needy we will gain the most happiness.
  • The job that will make us most contented is to help others.
  • The most beautiful ornament in our body is our smile.
  • The Dhamma is similar to a raft, being for the purpose of crossing over, not for the purpose of grasping'.
  • Let the wise man guard his thoughts, for they are difficult to perceive, very artful, and they rush wherever they wish: thoughts well guarded
    bring happiness.
  • It is good to tame the mind, which is difficult to hold in and flighty, rushing wherever it wishes; a tamed mind brings happiness.
  • Someone once said, "Life is a do-it-yourself project." Your attitude, and the choices you make today, help build the "house" you will live in
    tomorrow. Therefore, Build wisely.
  • The fool does not appreciate the act of generosity, but the wise does, and they will have happiness in the future.
  • The lack of wisdom meant that when a piece of information was given to a person, he was unable to process it and therefore, misinterpreted it
    altogether.
  • Truth is silent; it's views and opinions that make all the noise.
  • A destructive word to someone who is down can be what it takes to kill them.
  • There is power of life and death in the tongue. An encouraging word to someone who is down can lift them up and help them make it through the
    day.
  • Never allow yourself to get discouraged and think that your life is insignificant and cannot make a change.
  • "He abused me, he struck me, he overpowered me, he robbed me." Those who do not harbour such thoughts still their hatred.
  • "He abused me, he struck me, he overpowered me, he robbed me." Those who harbour such thoughts do not still their hatred.
  • There is no fire like lust;; there is on grip like hatred; there is no net river like craving.
  • Think not lightly of good, saying, "It will not come to me." Drop by drop is the water pot filled. Likewise, the wise man, gathering it little by
    little, fills himself with good.
  • think not lightly of evil, saying, "It will not come to me." Drop by drop is the water pot filled. Likewise, the fool, gathering it little by little, fills
    himself with evil.
  • One is not wise because one speaks much. He who is peaceable, friendly and fearless is called wise.
  • The sun shines by day, the moon shines by night. The warrior shines in armour, the holy man shines shines in meditation. But the Buddha shines
    resplendent in day and all night.
  • Life is all about choices, When we cut away all the junk, every situation is a choice. We ourselves choose how we react to situations. We choose
    how people affect our mood. We choose to be in a good mood or bad mood. The bottom line: It's our choice how we live our life.
  • A madman and an enlightened one both smile, but the enlightened one knows why while the madman doesn't.
  • We don't meditates to sea heaven, but to end suffering
  • Merely thinking about practace is like pouncing on the shadow and missing the substance.
  • Of course there are dozens of meditation techniques, but it all comes down to this - just let it all be. Step over here where it is cool, out of the
    battle. Why not give it a try?
  • We are always dissatisfied. In a sweet fruit, we miss the sour; in a sour fruit, we miss the sweet.
  • If you see certainty in that which is uncertain, you are bound to suffer.
  • When suffering arises, understand that there is no one to accept it. If you think suffering is yours, happiness is yours, you will not be able to
    find peace.
  • If you have time to be mindful, you have time to meditate.
  • Hunger is the worst disease, conditioned things the worst suffering. Knowing this as it really is, the wise realize Nibbana, the hightest bliss.
  • All tremble at violence; all fear death. Putting oneself in the place of another, one should not kill nor cause another to kill.
  • Don't just go and believe in the teacher because he says a fruit is sweet and delecious. Taste it for yourself and then all the doubting will be
    over.
  • Anyone can build a house of wood and bricks, but the Buddha taught us that sort of home is not our real home. It's a home in the world and it
    follows the ways of the world. Our real home is inner peace.
  • If you let go a little, you will have a little peace. If you let go a lot, you will have a lot of peace. If you let go completely, you will have complete
    peace.
  • Remember you don't meditate to "get" anything, but to get "rid" of things. We do it, not with desire, but with letting go. If you "want" anything,
    you won't find it.
  • The heart of the path is quite easy. There's no need to explain anything at length. Let go of love and hate and let things be. That's all that I do
    in my own practice.
  • Good it is to see the Noble ones; to live with them is ever blissful. One will always be happy by not encountering fools.
  • Better than a thousand useless words is one useful word (verse), hearing which one attains peace.
  • He whose cankers are destroyed and who is not attached to food, whose object is the Void, the Unconditioned Freedom - his path cannot be
    traced, like that of birds in the air.
  • He who is friendly amidst the hostile, peaceful amidst the violent, and unattached amidst hte attached - him do I call a holy man.
  • He who has renounced violence towards all living beings, weak or strong, whon neither kills nor causes others to kill - him do I call a holy man.
  • "He abused me, he struck me, he overpowered me, he robbed me, " Those who harbour such thoughts do not still their hatred.
  • "All things are not-self" - when one sees this with wisdom, one turns away from suffering. This is the path to purification.
  • One who destroys life, utters lies, takes what is not given, goes to anther man's life, and is addicted to intoxicating drinks - such a man digs up
    his own root even in this very would.
  • Do not associate with evil companions; do not seek the fellowship of the vile. Associate with good friends; seek the fellowship of noble men.
  • If the body could talk, it would be telling us all day long, "You're not my owner, you know." Actually it's telling it to us all the time, but it's
    Dhamma language, so we're unable to understand it.
  • Mind precedes all mental states. Mind is their chief; they are all mind-wrought. If with a pure mind a person speaks or acts, happiness follows
    him like his never-departing shadow.
  • Mind precedes all mental states. Mind is their chief; they are all mind-wrought. If with an impure mind a person speaks or acts, suffering follows
    him like the wheel that follows the foot of the ox.
  • Life is a do-it-yourself project." Your attitude, and the choices you make today, help build the "house" you will live in tomorrow. Therefore, Build
    wisely.
  • Life will give you back everything you have given to it.
  • Your life is not a coincidence. It's a reflection of you!
  • We don't become monks or nuns to eat well, sleep well, and be very comfortable, but to know suffering: - how to accept it ... - how to get rid of
    it ... - how not cause it. So don't do that which causes suffering, like indulging in greed, or it will never leave you.
  • "Only one book is worth reading: it is the heart."
  • You are your own teacher. Looking for teachers can't solve your own doubts. Investigate yourself to find the truth inside, not outside. Knowing
    yourself is most important.

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